Himachal Current Weather Conditions : Live Weather Forecast : Weather News

Dalhousie Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  16 Mind-Blowing Images From NOAA's 'Weather in Focus' Photo Contest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

They'll be on display in a special exhibit at the NOAA campus in July.
 

 •  See Venus and Jupiter Dance Together Tonight 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The celestial highlight of the month is actually a drama that has been building all through June: The two brightest planets in our sky — Venus and...
 

 •  Residents pick through charred remains of Washington homes 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Tom Bryant watched a wildfire charge up a hillside toward his home, then turned and told his wife it was time to go.That's when the front door burst open and a firefighter rushed in."He doesn't knock," Bryant recalled Monday.
 

 •  Dry Lightning to Increase Wildfire Risk Across Western US, Canada 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The combination of excessive heat and dry thunderstorms in many areas will add to the wildfire threat in the western part of United States and Canada through...
 

 •  Record Setting, Triple-Digits Heat Wave Continues in Northwest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The extreme heat is likely to last well into early July and may end up breaking records for longevity as well.
 

 •  Wildfires are already raging in the dried-out West coast — and it's about to get a lot worse 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Summer just started but wildfires are already ravaging the dried-out West coast. Since the beginning of June, nearly 300 fires have burned in Alaska, with a total of 1.1 million acres already destroyed just one month into the...
 

 •  France, UK issue heat warnings as high temps hit Europe 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A mass of hot air moving north from Africa is bringing unusually hot weather to Western Europe, with France the next in line for a scorching day.Forecasters said southern France could see temperatures over 40 C (104 F) on Tuesday, a day after Cordoba in southern Spain recorded nearly 44 C (111 F).Paris introduced special heat wave measures. They included opening air-conditioned rooms to the public and phoning people who might be especially vulnerable to the heat, primarily the elderly and those who can't leave their homes for medical reasons.Authorities warned that temperatures could...
 

 •  Gorgeous Night-Shining Clouds Glow in New Earth Images 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A silvery filigree of vapor hovers at the edge of the atmosphere in new images released by NASA. This glowing layer is made up of noctilucent, or...
 

 •  Lightning on Colorado mountain sends 3 hikers to hospital 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Lightning struck near the top of a more than 14,000-foot mountain popular with hikers, sending three people to hospitals, Colorado authorities said.It is not clear if they were directly hit...
 

 •  Atlantic Hurricane Season Lull to Persist as El Nino Limits Tropical Development 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

El Niño will continue to greatly limit tropical development in the Atlantic Basin and greatly scale back rainfall in the Caribbean. El Niño is associated...
 

 •  Spain, Portugal issue health alerts amid scorching temps 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Spain and Portugal both issued weather alerts Monday, advising residents to take extra care as temperatures soared...
 

 •  Extreme Temperatures Linked to Changing Air Patterns 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Scorching summertime heat waves in Europe, Asia and North America, as well as extreme cold snaps in central Asia, have become more likely because of changes in the way air is flowing over those regions, a new study detailed in the journal Nature suggests. A corporal of the Moscow Kremlin Guard helps another soldier on duty during the extreme heat wave that hit during July 2010. Credit: Boris SV/flickr The overall warming of the atmosphere that has resulted from the buildup of greenhouse gases has generally tipped the odds in favor of more extreme warm temperatures and fewer cold ones. But the way areas of high and low pressure meander around the globe can reinforce those odds, or counteract them. That leads to different patterns of temperature extremes in different places at different times. “It’s important to determine where we believe that some of the recent trends in circulation could potentially be linked with climate change, rather than just natural variability,” Ted Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the U.K., said in an email. Shepherd, who was not involved in the study, wrote an accompanying commentary on it in Nature. Using atmospheric data from the last 35 years, study author Daniel Horton, a Stanford University postdoc, and his colleagues found that persistent areas of high pressure in certain places were linked with extreme heat waves in Europe, western Asia and eastern North America. The position of the systems affected how air was directed over those areas. An example is the deadly Russian heatwave of 2010, which was the result of such a “stuck” high-pressure system that kept a large mass of hot, dry air parked over the region for weeks. Conversely, an increase in cold extremes over central Asia was associated with a pattern that led more Arctic air to flow in over the region. The trend in more cold extremes was strongest during the period since pronounced Arctic warming emerged, or about the last 25 years, which lends at least some support to the possibility that that warming is helping fuel the trend, Shepherd said. The potential influence of rapid Arctic warming on such extremes has been a hot research topic in recent years, though it is much debated in the climate community. This map shows how much temperatures over Russia varied from normal between July 20-27, 2010. The strong concentration of deep red over eastern Russia reflects the weeks-long heat wave that gripped the region that summer. Credit: NASA Whether or not these changes in atmospheric circulation are themselves linked to global warming wasn’t something the study tried to answer. Judah Cohen, who has conducted several studies on the Arctic warming-cold extremes connection, said that while the new study was “a nice analysis” and consistent with other findings, he thought it would “do little to settle or alleviate the differences” between the different camps on that question. Cohen, an atmospheric scientist with Atmospheric and Environmental Research, was also not involved in the study. While the new research didn’t answer what led to the particular atmospheric patterns associated with extreme temperatures, Horton hopes that they can use the same approach from the study to try to figure that out. He called the effort “a work in progress,” adding, “We don’t have answers yet.” Figuring out that answer is important to understanding what changes different regions might face in a warming world, because having a particular system parked over one area for a long time can also to lead to issues like drought and flooding. The ongoing California drought, for example, has been linked to a persistent high-pressure system that has kept much needed rains away.
 

 •  Heat Wave, Wildfire Threat to Last Into July for Western US 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Temperatures will continue to run well above normal across the western United States this week with this pattern lasting through the opening days of July.
 

 •  Phoenix hit by first dust storm of monsoon season 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The first big dust storm of the monsoon season slammed the Phoenix area on Saturday with winds snapping utility poles and leaving thousands without power.Arizona Public Service and Salt River Project, the two biggest utilities that serve metropolitan Phoenix, said Sunday that electricity had been restored to most customers.APS initially reported outages at 14,000 homes the night before. SRP at one point had more than 15,000 customers with no power.According to the National Weather Service, winds were up to 51 mph around Sky Harbor International...
 

 •  Weird and wild weather photos from June 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

 

 •  Continents Rose Above Oceans 3 Billion Years Ago 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The continents may have first risen high above the oceans of the world about 3 billion years ago, researchers say. 
 

 •  Boy Scout killed in flooding at New Mexico ranch 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A Boy Scout was killed when a flash flood triggered by heavy rains swept through a canyon on a New Mexico ranch where he was camping, authorities said on Sunday.
 

 •  Moonwalking Jackson Appears in Lightning-Illuminated Cloud 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Six years after Michael Jackson died of cardiac arrest, the King of Pop made an unusual "appearance" in an unlikely place during a June 23 lightning storm.
 

 •  Navy bases do their part to conserve water in California drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

With its red and green synthetic turf, Destroyer Field at Surface Warrior Park is meant to reduce water use at Naval Base San Diego. The softball field needs occasionally to be combed,...
 

 •  Alaska's Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The ice that tumbles into the ocean along Alaska’s coastline often makes for dramatic images that show one of the ravages of climate change – melting tidewater glaciers that contribute to sea level rise.
 

 •  San Francisco told to stop taking some water during drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Regulators on Friday told San Francisco to stop taking some of the river water it routinely stores in the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
 

 •  How to Protect Your Family From Rapidly Rising Floodwaters 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Having an emergency exit plan isn't just a good idea for fires, but it's also vital for flooding and other weather emergencies. 
 

 •  Action on Climate Key to Global Health, Reports Say 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The success of public health efforts across the globe in the coming decades will depend directly on the action the world takes to combat climate change, a new report published in the medical journal The Lancet concludes. 
 

 •  Tropical Activity Brewing in Central Pacific 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Meteorologist Kait Parker shows the brewing activity that could possible impact Hawaii.
 

 •  Egypt sees sandstorm and earthquake on the same day 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

<p>Egypt faced treacherous weather conditions Saturday as a sandstorm blanketed the north of the country and a magnitude-5.2 earthquake centered in the Sinai peninsula shook buildings more than 200 miles away in the capital, Cairo.</p>
 

 •  A New Earthquake Early-Warning System for Mexico City 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The morning of Good Friday 2014 found Andy Meira standing outside his apartment in Mexico City with his wife and baby, waiting for the shaking to begin. 
 

 •  Insurance Agents Are Pretty Freaked Out About Climate Change 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Ominous Clouds Pato Garza/Flickr CC by 2.0 Rarely does a document prepared by an insurance group read like an apocalyptic screenplay. But it does happen. In this case, Lloyds, a storied insurance market put out a report outlining the potential global meltdown that could occur if parts of the food supply chain failed. It turns out that without food, society could go down pretty quickly. The report looks at what would happen if just three weather events (for example, drought in one area, too much rain in another, and disease in a third) threw off crop yields. They found that even a small reduction in the amount of crops like wheat, rice, and soybeans could lead to skyrocketing food prices, riots, declines in the stock market and political instability. So why do insurance companies care? Because they're the ones that are betting against disaster. If something goes wrong, they're the ones that have to pay out claims. From the report: A systemic shock to global food supply could trigger significant claims across multiple classes of insurance, including (but not limited to) terrorism and political violence, political risk, business interruption, marine and aviation, agriculture, product liability and recall, and environmental liability. And what could make all of this just that much worse? Climate change: As the pressure on our global food supply rises, so too does its vulnerability to sudden acute disruptions. Although there is a large amount of uncertainty about exactly how climate change might impact world food production over the coming decades, there is general consensus that the overall effect will be negative. Sounds bad. But it gets worse. The horsemen of the climate change apocalypse in this case are Extreme Weather (who rides with drought, floods and wildfires, all of which are slated to get stronger with climate change), and Pestilence, who sticks around in the form of agricultural pests and diseases (which also get more prevalent with climate change). Loss of crops because of weather or disease could strain food supplies, and tensions over food supplies between governments mean that War and Death get to come along for the ride too. The band's back together! The report, Lloyds stresses, is not a "prediction" but rather "an exploration of what might happen based on past events and scientific, social and economic theory." Let's hope we don't end up living in it.
 

Dharamsala / Dharamshala Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  Currently: Mostly Clear: 16C 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Currently in Dharamsala, IN: 16 °C and Mostly Clear
 

 •  7/1/2015 Forecast 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

High: 27 C Low: 15 C A shower and t-storm around
 

 •  7/2/2015 Forecast 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

High: 30 C Low: 18 C Some sun with a thunderstorm
 

 •  The AccuWeather.com RSS Center 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

To discover additional weather feeds, visit the AccuWeather.com RSS Center at http://www.accuweather.com/en/downloads
 

Kullu Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  16 Mind-Blowing Images From NOAA's 'Weather in Focus' Photo Contest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

They'll be on display in a special exhibit at the NOAA campus in July.
 

 •  See Venus and Jupiter Dance Together Tonight 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The celestial highlight of the month is actually a drama that has been building all through June: The two brightest planets in our sky — Venus and...
 

 •  Residents pick through charred remains of Washington homes 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Tom Bryant watched a wildfire charge up a hillside toward his home, then turned and told his wife it was time to go.That's when the front door burst open and a firefighter rushed in."He doesn't knock," Bryant recalled Monday.
 

 •  Dry Lightning to Increase Wildfire Risk Across Western US, Canada 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The combination of excessive heat and dry thunderstorms in many areas will add to the wildfire threat in the western part of United States and Canada through...
 

 •  Record Setting, Triple-Digits Heat Wave Continues in Northwest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The extreme heat is likely to last well into early July and may end up breaking records for longevity as well.
 

 •  Wildfires are already raging in the dried-out West coast — and it's about to get a lot worse 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Summer just started but wildfires are already ravaging the dried-out West coast. Since the beginning of June, nearly 300 fires have burned in Alaska, with a total of 1.1 million acres already destroyed just one month into the...
 

 •  France, UK issue heat warnings as high temps hit Europe 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A mass of hot air moving north from Africa is bringing unusually hot weather to Western Europe, with France the next in line for a scorching day.Forecasters said southern France could see temperatures over 40 C (104 F) on Tuesday, a day after Cordoba in southern Spain recorded nearly 44 C (111 F).Paris introduced special heat wave measures. They included opening air-conditioned rooms to the public and phoning people who might be especially vulnerable to the heat, primarily the elderly and those who can't leave their homes for medical reasons.Authorities warned that temperatures could...
 

 •  Gorgeous Night-Shining Clouds Glow in New Earth Images 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A silvery filigree of vapor hovers at the edge of the atmosphere in new images released by NASA. This glowing layer is made up of noctilucent, or...
 

 •  Lightning on Colorado mountain sends 3 hikers to hospital 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Lightning struck near the top of a more than 14,000-foot mountain popular with hikers, sending three people to hospitals, Colorado authorities said.It is not clear if they were directly hit...
 

 •  Atlantic Hurricane Season Lull to Persist as El Nino Limits Tropical Development 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

El Niño will continue to greatly limit tropical development in the Atlantic Basin and greatly scale back rainfall in the Caribbean. El Niño is associated...
 

 •  Spain, Portugal issue health alerts amid scorching temps 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Spain and Portugal both issued weather alerts Monday, advising residents to take extra care as temperatures soared...
 

 •  Extreme Temperatures Linked to Changing Air Patterns 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Scorching summertime heat waves in Europe, Asia and North America, as well as extreme cold snaps in central Asia, have become more likely because of changes in the way air is flowing over those regions, a new study detailed in the journal Nature suggests. A corporal of the Moscow Kremlin Guard helps another soldier on duty during the extreme heat wave that hit during July 2010. Credit: Boris SV/flickr The overall warming of the atmosphere that has resulted from the buildup of greenhouse gases has generally tipped the odds in favor of more extreme warm temperatures and fewer cold ones. But the way areas of high and low pressure meander around the globe can reinforce those odds, or counteract them. That leads to different patterns of temperature extremes in different places at different times. “It’s important to determine where we believe that some of the recent trends in circulation could potentially be linked with climate change, rather than just natural variability,” Ted Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the U.K., said in an email. Shepherd, who was not involved in the study, wrote an accompanying commentary on it in Nature. Using atmospheric data from the last 35 years, study author Daniel Horton, a Stanford University postdoc, and his colleagues found that persistent areas of high pressure in certain places were linked with extreme heat waves in Europe, western Asia and eastern North America. The position of the systems affected how air was directed over those areas. An example is the deadly Russian heatwave of 2010, which was the result of such a “stuck” high-pressure system that kept a large mass of hot, dry air parked over the region for weeks. Conversely, an increase in cold extremes over central Asia was associated with a pattern that led more Arctic air to flow in over the region. The trend in more cold extremes was strongest during the period since pronounced Arctic warming emerged, or about the last 25 years, which lends at least some support to the possibility that that warming is helping fuel the trend, Shepherd said. The potential influence of rapid Arctic warming on such extremes has been a hot research topic in recent years, though it is much debated in the climate community. This map shows how much temperatures over Russia varied from normal between July 20-27, 2010. The strong concentration of deep red over eastern Russia reflects the weeks-long heat wave that gripped the region that summer. Credit: NASA Whether or not these changes in atmospheric circulation are themselves linked to global warming wasn’t something the study tried to answer. Judah Cohen, who has conducted several studies on the Arctic warming-cold extremes connection, said that while the new study was “a nice analysis” and consistent with other findings, he thought it would “do little to settle or alleviate the differences” between the different camps on that question. Cohen, an atmospheric scientist with Atmospheric and Environmental Research, was also not involved in the study. While the new research didn’t answer what led to the particular atmospheric patterns associated with extreme temperatures, Horton hopes that they can use the same approach from the study to try to figure that out. He called the effort “a work in progress,” adding, “We don’t have answers yet.” Figuring out that answer is important to understanding what changes different regions might face in a warming world, because having a particular system parked over one area for a long time can also to lead to issues like drought and flooding. The ongoing California drought, for example, has been linked to a persistent high-pressure system that has kept much needed rains away.
 

 •  Heat Wave, Wildfire Threat to Last Into July for Western US 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Temperatures will continue to run well above normal across the western United States this week with this pattern lasting through the opening days of July.
 

 •  Phoenix hit by first dust storm of monsoon season 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The first big dust storm of the monsoon season slammed the Phoenix area on Saturday with winds snapping utility poles and leaving thousands without power.Arizona Public Service and Salt River Project, the two biggest utilities that serve metropolitan Phoenix, said Sunday that electricity had been restored to most customers.APS initially reported outages at 14,000 homes the night before. SRP at one point had more than 15,000 customers with no power.According to the National Weather Service, winds were up to 51 mph around Sky Harbor International...
 

 •  Weird and wild weather photos from June 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

 

 •  Continents Rose Above Oceans 3 Billion Years Ago 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The continents may have first risen high above the oceans of the world about 3 billion years ago, researchers say. 
 

 •  Boy Scout killed in flooding at New Mexico ranch 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A Boy Scout was killed when a flash flood triggered by heavy rains swept through a canyon on a New Mexico ranch where he was camping, authorities said on Sunday.
 

 •  Moonwalking Jackson Appears in Lightning-Illuminated Cloud 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Six years after Michael Jackson died of cardiac arrest, the King of Pop made an unusual "appearance" in an unlikely place during a June 23 lightning storm.
 

 •  Navy bases do their part to conserve water in California drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

With its red and green synthetic turf, Destroyer Field at Surface Warrior Park is meant to reduce water use at Naval Base San Diego. The softball field needs occasionally to be combed,...
 

 •  Alaska's Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The ice that tumbles into the ocean along Alaska’s coastline often makes for dramatic images that show one of the ravages of climate change – melting tidewater glaciers that contribute to sea level rise.
 

 •  San Francisco told to stop taking some water during drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Regulators on Friday told San Francisco to stop taking some of the river water it routinely stores in the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
 

 •  How to Protect Your Family From Rapidly Rising Floodwaters 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Having an emergency exit plan isn't just a good idea for fires, but it's also vital for flooding and other weather emergencies. 
 

 •  Action on Climate Key to Global Health, Reports Say 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The success of public health efforts across the globe in the coming decades will depend directly on the action the world takes to combat climate change, a new report published in the medical journal The Lancet concludes. 
 

 •  Tropical Activity Brewing in Central Pacific 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Meteorologist Kait Parker shows the brewing activity that could possible impact Hawaii.
 

 •  Egypt sees sandstorm and earthquake on the same day 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

<p>Egypt faced treacherous weather conditions Saturday as a sandstorm blanketed the north of the country and a magnitude-5.2 earthquake centered in the Sinai peninsula shook buildings more than 200 miles away in the capital, Cairo.</p>
 

 •  A New Earthquake Early-Warning System for Mexico City 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The morning of Good Friday 2014 found Andy Meira standing outside his apartment in Mexico City with his wife and baby, waiting for the shaking to begin. 
 

 •  Insurance Agents Are Pretty Freaked Out About Climate Change 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Ominous Clouds Pato Garza/Flickr CC by 2.0 Rarely does a document prepared by an insurance group read like an apocalyptic screenplay. But it does happen. In this case, Lloyds, a storied insurance market put out a report outlining the potential global meltdown that could occur if parts of the food supply chain failed. It turns out that without food, society could go down pretty quickly. The report looks at what would happen if just three weather events (for example, drought in one area, too much rain in another, and disease in a third) threw off crop yields. They found that even a small reduction in the amount of crops like wheat, rice, and soybeans could lead to skyrocketing food prices, riots, declines in the stock market and political instability. So why do insurance companies care? Because they're the ones that are betting against disaster. If something goes wrong, they're the ones that have to pay out claims. From the report: A systemic shock to global food supply could trigger significant claims across multiple classes of insurance, including (but not limited to) terrorism and political violence, political risk, business interruption, marine and aviation, agriculture, product liability and recall, and environmental liability. And what could make all of this just that much worse? Climate change: As the pressure on our global food supply rises, so too does its vulnerability to sudden acute disruptions. Although there is a large amount of uncertainty about exactly how climate change might impact world food production over the coming decades, there is general consensus that the overall effect will be negative. Sounds bad. But it gets worse. The horsemen of the climate change apocalypse in this case are Extreme Weather (who rides with drought, floods and wildfires, all of which are slated to get stronger with climate change), and Pestilence, who sticks around in the form of agricultural pests and diseases (which also get more prevalent with climate change). Loss of crops because of weather or disease could strain food supplies, and tensions over food supplies between governments mean that War and Death get to come along for the ride too. The band's back together! The report, Lloyds stresses, is not a "prediction" but rather "an exploration of what might happen based on past events and scientific, social and economic theory." Let's hope we don't end up living in it.
 

Manali Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  Currently: Mostly Cloudy: 29C 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Currently in Manali, IN: 29 °C and Mostly Cloudy
 

 •  7/1/2015 Forecast 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

High: 37 C Low: 27 C Partly sunny and very warm
 

 •  7/2/2015 Forecast 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

High: 38 C Low: 28 C Very warm with clouds and sun
 

 •  The AccuWeather.com RSS Center 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

To discover additional weather feeds, visit the AccuWeather.com RSS Center at http://www.accuweather.com/en/downloads
 

Shimla Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  16 Mind-Blowing Images From NOAA's 'Weather in Focus' Photo Contest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

They'll be on display in a special exhibit at the NOAA campus in July.
 

 •  See Venus and Jupiter Dance Together Tonight 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The celestial highlight of the month is actually a drama that has been building all through June: The two brightest planets in our sky — Venus and...
 

 •  Residents pick through charred remains of Washington homes 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Tom Bryant watched a wildfire charge up a hillside toward his home, then turned and told his wife it was time to go.That's when the front door burst open and a firefighter rushed in."He doesn't knock," Bryant recalled Monday.
 

 •  Dry Lightning to Increase Wildfire Risk Across Western US, Canada 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The combination of excessive heat and dry thunderstorms in many areas will add to the wildfire threat in the western part of United States and Canada through...
 

 •  Record Setting, Triple-Digits Heat Wave Continues in Northwest 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The extreme heat is likely to last well into early July and may end up breaking records for longevity as well.
 

 •  Wildfires are already raging in the dried-out West coast — and it's about to get a lot worse 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Summer just started but wildfires are already ravaging the dried-out West coast. Since the beginning of June, nearly 300 fires have burned in Alaska, with a total of 1.1 million acres already destroyed just one month into the...
 

 •  France, UK issue heat warnings as high temps hit Europe 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A mass of hot air moving north from Africa is bringing unusually hot weather to Western Europe, with France the next in line for a scorching day.Forecasters said southern France could see temperatures over 40 C (104 F) on Tuesday, a day after Cordoba in southern Spain recorded nearly 44 C (111 F).Paris introduced special heat wave measures. They included opening air-conditioned rooms to the public and phoning people who might be especially vulnerable to the heat, primarily the elderly and those who can't leave their homes for medical reasons.Authorities warned that temperatures could...
 

 •  Gorgeous Night-Shining Clouds Glow in New Earth Images 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A silvery filigree of vapor hovers at the edge of the atmosphere in new images released by NASA. This glowing layer is made up of noctilucent, or...
 

 •  Lightning on Colorado mountain sends 3 hikers to hospital 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Lightning struck near the top of a more than 14,000-foot mountain popular with hikers, sending three people to hospitals, Colorado authorities said.It is not clear if they were directly hit...
 

 •  Atlantic Hurricane Season Lull to Persist as El Nino Limits Tropical Development 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

El Niño will continue to greatly limit tropical development in the Atlantic Basin and greatly scale back rainfall in the Caribbean. El Niño is associated...
 

 •  Spain, Portugal issue health alerts amid scorching temps 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Spain and Portugal both issued weather alerts Monday, advising residents to take extra care as temperatures soared...
 

 •  Extreme Temperatures Linked to Changing Air Patterns 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Scorching summertime heat waves in Europe, Asia and North America, as well as extreme cold snaps in central Asia, have become more likely because of changes in the way air is flowing over those regions, a new study detailed in the journal Nature suggests. A corporal of the Moscow Kremlin Guard helps another soldier on duty during the extreme heat wave that hit during July 2010. Credit: Boris SV/flickr The overall warming of the atmosphere that has resulted from the buildup of greenhouse gases has generally tipped the odds in favor of more extreme warm temperatures and fewer cold ones. But the way areas of high and low pressure meander around the globe can reinforce those odds, or counteract them. That leads to different patterns of temperature extremes in different places at different times. “It’s important to determine where we believe that some of the recent trends in circulation could potentially be linked with climate change, rather than just natural variability,” Ted Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the U.K., said in an email. Shepherd, who was not involved in the study, wrote an accompanying commentary on it in Nature. Using atmospheric data from the last 35 years, study author Daniel Horton, a Stanford University postdoc, and his colleagues found that persistent areas of high pressure in certain places were linked with extreme heat waves in Europe, western Asia and eastern North America. The position of the systems affected how air was directed over those areas. An example is the deadly Russian heatwave of 2010, which was the result of such a “stuck” high-pressure system that kept a large mass of hot, dry air parked over the region for weeks. Conversely, an increase in cold extremes over central Asia was associated with a pattern that led more Arctic air to flow in over the region. The trend in more cold extremes was strongest during the period since pronounced Arctic warming emerged, or about the last 25 years, which lends at least some support to the possibility that that warming is helping fuel the trend, Shepherd said. The potential influence of rapid Arctic warming on such extremes has been a hot research topic in recent years, though it is much debated in the climate community. This map shows how much temperatures over Russia varied from normal between July 20-27, 2010. The strong concentration of deep red over eastern Russia reflects the weeks-long heat wave that gripped the region that summer. Credit: NASA Whether or not these changes in atmospheric circulation are themselves linked to global warming wasn’t something the study tried to answer. Judah Cohen, who has conducted several studies on the Arctic warming-cold extremes connection, said that while the new study was “a nice analysis” and consistent with other findings, he thought it would “do little to settle or alleviate the differences” between the different camps on that question. Cohen, an atmospheric scientist with Atmospheric and Environmental Research, was also not involved in the study. While the new research didn’t answer what led to the particular atmospheric patterns associated with extreme temperatures, Horton hopes that they can use the same approach from the study to try to figure that out. He called the effort “a work in progress,” adding, “We don’t have answers yet.” Figuring out that answer is important to understanding what changes different regions might face in a warming world, because having a particular system parked over one area for a long time can also to lead to issues like drought and flooding. The ongoing California drought, for example, has been linked to a persistent high-pressure system that has kept much needed rains away.
 

 •  Heat Wave, Wildfire Threat to Last Into July for Western US 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Temperatures will continue to run well above normal across the western United States this week with this pattern lasting through the opening days of July.
 

 •  Phoenix hit by first dust storm of monsoon season 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The first big dust storm of the monsoon season slammed the Phoenix area on Saturday with winds snapping utility poles and leaving thousands without power.Arizona Public Service and Salt River Project, the two biggest utilities that serve metropolitan Phoenix, said Sunday that electricity had been restored to most customers.APS initially reported outages at 14,000 homes the night before. SRP at one point had more than 15,000 customers with no power.According to the National Weather Service, winds were up to 51 mph around Sky Harbor International...
 

 •  Weird and wild weather photos from June 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

 

 •  Continents Rose Above Oceans 3 Billion Years Ago 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The continents may have first risen high above the oceans of the world about 3 billion years ago, researchers say. 
 

 •  Boy Scout killed in flooding at New Mexico ranch 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

A Boy Scout was killed when a flash flood triggered by heavy rains swept through a canyon on a New Mexico ranch where he was camping, authorities said on Sunday.
 

 •  Moonwalking Jackson Appears in Lightning-Illuminated Cloud 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Six years after Michael Jackson died of cardiac arrest, the King of Pop made an unusual "appearance" in an unlikely place during a June 23 lightning storm.
 

 •  Navy bases do their part to conserve water in California drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

With its red and green synthetic turf, Destroyer Field at Surface Warrior Park is meant to reduce water use at Naval Base San Diego. The softball field needs occasionally to be combed,...
 

 •  Alaska's Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The ice that tumbles into the ocean along Alaska’s coastline often makes for dramatic images that show one of the ravages of climate change – melting tidewater glaciers that contribute to sea level rise.
 

 •  San Francisco told to stop taking some water during drought 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Regulators on Friday told San Francisco to stop taking some of the river water it routinely stores in the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
 

 •  How to Protect Your Family From Rapidly Rising Floodwaters 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Having an emergency exit plan isn't just a good idea for fires, but it's also vital for flooding and other weather emergencies. 
 

 •  Action on Climate Key to Global Health, Reports Say 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The success of public health efforts across the globe in the coming decades will depend directly on the action the world takes to combat climate change, a new report published in the medical journal The Lancet concludes. 
 

 •  Tropical Activity Brewing in Central Pacific 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Meteorologist Kait Parker shows the brewing activity that could possible impact Hawaii.
 

 •  Egypt sees sandstorm and earthquake on the same day 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

<p>Egypt faced treacherous weather conditions Saturday as a sandstorm blanketed the north of the country and a magnitude-5.2 earthquake centered in the Sinai peninsula shook buildings more than 200 miles away in the capital, Cairo.</p>
 

 •  A New Earthquake Early-Warning System for Mexico City 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

The morning of Good Friday 2014 found Andy Meira standing outside his apartment in Mexico City with his wife and baby, waiting for the shaking to begin. 
 

 •  Insurance Agents Are Pretty Freaked Out About Climate Change 06/30/2015 12:40 PM

Ominous Clouds Pato Garza/Flickr CC by 2.0 Rarely does a document prepared by an insurance group read like an apocalyptic screenplay. But it does happen. In this case, Lloyds, a storied insurance market put out a report outlining the potential global meltdown that could occur if parts of the food supply chain failed. It turns out that without food, society could go down pretty quickly. The report looks at what would happen if just three weather events (for example, drought in one area, too much rain in another, and disease in a third) threw off crop yields. They found that even a small reduction in the amount of crops like wheat, rice, and soybeans could lead to skyrocketing food prices, riots, declines in the stock market and political instability. So why do insurance companies care? Because they're the ones that are betting against disaster. If something goes wrong, they're the ones that have to pay out claims. From the report: A systemic shock to global food supply could trigger significant claims across multiple classes of insurance, including (but not limited to) terrorism and political violence, political risk, business interruption, marine and aviation, agriculture, product liability and recall, and environmental liability. And what could make all of this just that much worse? Climate change: As the pressure on our global food supply rises, so too does its vulnerability to sudden acute disruptions. Although there is a large amount of uncertainty about exactly how climate change might impact world food production over the coming decades, there is general consensus that the overall effect will be negative. Sounds bad. But it gets worse. The horsemen of the climate change apocalypse in this case are Extreme Weather (who rides with drought, floods and wildfires, all of which are slated to get stronger with climate change), and Pestilence, who sticks around in the form of agricultural pests and diseases (which also get more prevalent with climate change). Loss of crops because of weather or disease could strain food supplies, and tensions over food supplies between governments mean that War and Death get to come along for the ride too. The band's back together! The report, Lloyds stresses, is not a "prediction" but rather "an exploration of what might happen based on past events and scientific, social and economic theory." Let's hope we don't end up living in it.