Himachal Current Weather Conditions : Live Weather Forecast : Weather News

Dalhousie Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  The Milky Way Over Loon Island: A Stargazer's Stunning View (Photo) 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

This stunning panoramic of the Milky Way shows our host galaxy arching over Lake Sunapee. Astrophotographer A. Garrett Evans took the image Loon...
 

 •  System to Deliver Showers to West, Storms to Plains 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A new system moving into the West this week will spread showers over the region before raising the severe weather threat in the Plains. It does not look...
 

 •  Stunning images from this week in weather 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

 

 •  Almonds get roasted in debate over California water use 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California almonds are becoming one of the world's favorite snacks and creating a multibillion-dollar bonanza for agricultural investors. But the crop extracts a staggering price from the land, consuming more...
 

 •  Severe Threat for East Coast 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

11:21AM ET 04.19.15 The system that has been bringing severe weather to the Midwest and South is heading for the East Coast. It could be a stormy start of the week for millions.
 

 •  Agencies to Place 3-D Printed Weather Stations in Developing Countries 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A 3-D printer is creating the parts for affordable weather stations to be used in developing nations, where weather data is very limited. Data from the...
 

 •  Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

From blooming flowers to twittering birds, the signs of spring are popping up and the miseries of winter are becoming a distant memory for many. But not for some climate scientists. The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters as a wild zigzag of the jet stream has brought repeated bouts of Arctic air and snow to the East and kept the drought-plagued West baking under a record-breaking dome of heat. How temperatures across the U.S. varied compared to normal during February 2015, with red denoting hotter temperatures and blue colder. Credit: NOAA That persistent "warm west, cold east” winter pattern has set off a flurry of research aimed at uncovering why those regions of the U.S. spent winter locked in polar opposite situations, with plenty of questions remaining — including how global warming might be influencing whatever set the atmospheric pattern in motion. The climate shifts of the Pacific Ocean have been considered a primary suspect in driving the seemingly unbreakable divide, in part because many of these have a clear influence on U.S. weather. But two recent studies have pushed past these well-known climate cycles and brought attention to some other, perhaps underappreciated players, in both the Pacific and the Arctic. In one study, Dennis Hartmann, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington, pinpointed a climate cycle that seems to be linked to the most well-known of such phenomena, El Niño. This “new” cycle — which Hartmann calls the North Pacific Mode (NPM) — has been hinted at before, but hasn’t received as much scientific attention as its cousin. Like El Niño, the NPM features changes in ocean temperatures that then alter the circulation of the atmosphere, including over the U.S. The latter is marked by a pool of warm water in the tropical Pacific that sets off a domino effect in the atmosphere that shifts the jet stream around over the U.S. Similarly, the NPM features an area of raised ocean temperatures, but this time in a horseshoe pattern that reaches from the tropics, past the West Coast and into the North Pacific. Historical temperature records that Hartmann examined suggest that it also precedes an El Niño event. Both the warm water signature and a burgeoning El Niño were present over the past couple of years in the Pacific. Most importantly, the temperature records also show that the NPM matches up with the “warm West, cold East” divide that governed the last two winters. Specifically, it seems to historically coincide with a high pressure ridge over the West and a trough over the East. But their simultaneous appearance doesn’t prove the NPM caused the weather divide. To see if that could be the case, Hartmann used climate models, where he could plug in the warm sea surface temperatures and see if the East-West pattern followed. In his simulations, it did. The horseshoe pattern of warmer-than-normal Pacific Ocean waters that characterize the positive phase of the North Pacific Mode. Credit: Hartmann/Geophysical Research Letters Hartmann’s study, published online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, provides “compelling evidence” for a link between the Pacific Ocean temperature signature and the stuck weather pattern, said John Walsh, an atmospheric scientist at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, who wasn’t involved in the studies. But is that the whole story? The other recent study suggests that the Arctic, too, could be playing a role in making the difference between East and West so stark. That study, also detailed in Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that while the Pacific heat set the atmospheric pattern in motion, Arctic sea ice loss in a particular region made the warm/cold difference so extreme, said Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University. Francis, who wasn’t involved with either study, is one of the main proponents of an idea that by altering how much heat the ocean lets out, sea ice melt and Arctic warming can also change atmospheric circulation patterns, in particular by making the jet stream form larger peaks, or highs, and troughs, or lows. Hence the more intense difference between East and West the last two winters. However, not all scientists are convinced by this idea and it has generated much debate in recent years. One key question Hartmann is keen on better understanding is how the overall warming of the planet might impact the climate cycles that potentially put the divide in place. In the historical records, he noticed that the NPM has been more prevalent since the 1970s — about the same time that the global temperature rise really took off. That raises the question of whether this pattern might become a more common influence on U.S. weather in the future. It’s a difficult question to answer, though, because climate models “are not in agreement on what should happen in the Pacific as a consequence of global warming,” Hartmann said. Given the terrible drought and dismal snowpack the warm Western winter has resulted in, “it would be likely a hugely bad thing if the global warming response was to give us more of this” East-West divided pattern, he said.
 

 •  Obama Says There Is ‘No Greater Threat’ Than Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

“Climate change can no longer be denied, or ignored,” the president says.
 

 •  California revises drought plan after pressure from cities 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California water regulators on Saturday revised a still-tentative drought plan by easing cuts for Los Angeles and San Diego and bumping up reduction targets in the areas that consume the most water.
 

 •  Severe weather stops circus act 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Severe weather forced a highwire trapeze act at a circus in Texas to stop and sent people running for the exits.
 

 •  Thunderstorms cause power outages, flight delays in Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Storms packing winds approaching 90 mph are sweeping across parts of Texas and Oklahoma, causing widespread power outages in the Dallas area — including at a professional soccer game.</p>
 

 •  New England's snowy winter pushes back gardening season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>The growing season is one to two weeks behind schedule after a winter that lacked the usual mid-season thaw and kept the snow piling up.</p>
 

 •  Nepal marks anniversary of deadliest avalanche 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Nepal on Saturday marked the anniversary of Mount Everest's deadliest avalanche with a memorial and a government announcement that it will set up a welfare fund for mountaineering and trekking workers in the Himalayan nation.</p>
 

 •  With his well nearly dry, a farmer draws on his resolve 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

REPORTING FROM POPLAR-COTTON CENTER, Calif. -- It was done. Over. No more waiting for rain, hoping for snow. The 32-year-old farmer in the barber's chair said his well wouldn't make it to summer. "I held...
 

 •  Photos: Sinkholes Form Along Shoreline of the Dead Sea 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The Dead Sea is disappearing at an alarming rate, leaving behind thousands of sinkholes that are chipping away at the coastline's vibrant and touristy...
 

 •  Fish in suspected tsunami debris boat quarantined in US 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The wreckage of a fishing boat that appears to be debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami was carrying some unexpected passengers — fish from Japanese waters — when it was spotted off the Oregon coast.Scientists say 21 yellowtail jacks and one Asian striped knifejaw hitched a cross-Pacific...
 

 •  Early Haiti rains bring risk of bleak cholera season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Haitian officials are reporting a spike in cholera cases late last year and carrying over into the first three months of 2015 as an early start to the rainy season has public health workers worried.
 

 •  Dutch Citizens Are Taking Their Government To Court Over Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A group of Dutch citizens headed to court this week in a bold effort to hold their government accountable for its inaction over climate change.
 

 •  How do MLB teams prepare for severe weather? 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>With 2,340 games scheduled from early spring to late summer every year, Major League Baseball is not unfamiliar with encountering challenging weather during its season.</p>
 

 •  Tornado Touches Down in Texas Panhandle 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail. The National Weather Service warned of damaging winds of 60mph in the area.This video shows the tornado near Briscoe. Credit: Facebook/Dustin Pool
 

 •  Lightning Strike Blinds Woman in One Eye 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Being struck by lightning is a rare event, and it can have some equally unusual medical effects. For one 77-year-old woman who survived being hit...
 

 •  Blizzard Conditions Contribute to Multi-Vehicle Crashes on I-80 in Wyo. 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

At least six people were critically injured Thursday after a 45-vehicle pile-up on a snowy Interstate 80 between Laramie and Cheyenne, Wyoming. Speeds...
 

 •  WATCH: Tornado Spotted In Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Apr 17, 2015; 7:51 AM ET A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail.
 

 •  March was hottest worldwide since 1880 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Rising temperatures across the planet have set another new record, as the US government announced Friday that the globe experienced its hottest month of March since record-keeping began in 1880.</p>
 

 •  Beijing's worst sandstorm in 13 years is just 'normal spring weather' 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Rule No. 1 for surviving Beijing's often-brutal living conditions: Develop a sense of humor. Smog. Frigid winters. Smog. Scorching summers. Smog. Gridlocked traffic. And oh, have you heard about the smog? The latest air assault came Wednesday afternoon, when a mighty wind transported several tons of Gobi Desert sand straight into China's capital.
 

 •  Harsh Northeast winter no hindrance to hungry ticks 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Think you're safe from ticks because the harsh winter froze them or because you haven't been trekking through the woods?Think again. Researchers focused on ticks and the debilitating diseases they spread say the heavy snow that blanketed the Northeast this winter was like a cozy quilt for baby blacklegged ticks that are now questing for blood as the weather warms up. And a researcher at New York's Binghamton University...
 

 •  Woman Swept Off Cliff by Giant Wave 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Brian Smith, and American student in Ireland was visiting the coast when he shot some amazing video.
 

 •  China's Smog Inspires Absolutely Terrifying PSAs 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Billowing smoke and furious animals combine in these "terror haze" illustrations.
 

Dharamsala / Dharamshala Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  The AccuWeather.com RSS Center 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

To discover additional weather feeds, visit the AccuWeather.com RSS Center at http://www.accuweather.com/en/downloads
 

Kullu Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  The Milky Way Over Loon Island: A Stargazer's Stunning View (Photo) 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

This stunning panoramic of the Milky Way shows our host galaxy arching over Lake Sunapee. Astrophotographer A. Garrett Evans took the image Loon...
 

 •  System to Deliver Showers to West, Storms to Plains 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A new system moving into the West this week will spread showers over the region before raising the severe weather threat in the Plains. It does not look...
 

 •  Stunning images from this week in weather 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

 

 •  Almonds get roasted in debate over California water use 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California almonds are becoming one of the world's favorite snacks and creating a multibillion-dollar bonanza for agricultural investors. But the crop extracts a staggering price from the land, consuming more...
 

 •  Severe Threat for East Coast 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

11:21AM ET 04.19.15 The system that has been bringing severe weather to the Midwest and South is heading for the East Coast. It could be a stormy start of the week for millions.
 

 •  Agencies to Place 3-D Printed Weather Stations in Developing Countries 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A 3-D printer is creating the parts for affordable weather stations to be used in developing nations, where weather data is very limited. Data from the...
 

 •  Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

From blooming flowers to twittering birds, the signs of spring are popping up and the miseries of winter are becoming a distant memory for many. But not for some climate scientists. The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters as a wild zigzag of the jet stream has brought repeated bouts of Arctic air and snow to the East and kept the drought-plagued West baking under a record-breaking dome of heat. How temperatures across the U.S. varied compared to normal during February 2015, with red denoting hotter temperatures and blue colder. Credit: NOAA That persistent "warm west, cold east” winter pattern has set off a flurry of research aimed at uncovering why those regions of the U.S. spent winter locked in polar opposite situations, with plenty of questions remaining — including how global warming might be influencing whatever set the atmospheric pattern in motion. The climate shifts of the Pacific Ocean have been considered a primary suspect in driving the seemingly unbreakable divide, in part because many of these have a clear influence on U.S. weather. But two recent studies have pushed past these well-known climate cycles and brought attention to some other, perhaps underappreciated players, in both the Pacific and the Arctic. In one study, Dennis Hartmann, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington, pinpointed a climate cycle that seems to be linked to the most well-known of such phenomena, El Niño. This “new” cycle — which Hartmann calls the North Pacific Mode (NPM) — has been hinted at before, but hasn’t received as much scientific attention as its cousin. Like El Niño, the NPM features changes in ocean temperatures that then alter the circulation of the atmosphere, including over the U.S. The latter is marked by a pool of warm water in the tropical Pacific that sets off a domino effect in the atmosphere that shifts the jet stream around over the U.S. Similarly, the NPM features an area of raised ocean temperatures, but this time in a horseshoe pattern that reaches from the tropics, past the West Coast and into the North Pacific. Historical temperature records that Hartmann examined suggest that it also precedes an El Niño event. Both the warm water signature and a burgeoning El Niño were present over the past couple of years in the Pacific. Most importantly, the temperature records also show that the NPM matches up with the “warm West, cold East” divide that governed the last two winters. Specifically, it seems to historically coincide with a high pressure ridge over the West and a trough over the East. But their simultaneous appearance doesn’t prove the NPM caused the weather divide. To see if that could be the case, Hartmann used climate models, where he could plug in the warm sea surface temperatures and see if the East-West pattern followed. In his simulations, it did. The horseshoe pattern of warmer-than-normal Pacific Ocean waters that characterize the positive phase of the North Pacific Mode. Credit: Hartmann/Geophysical Research Letters Hartmann’s study, published online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, provides “compelling evidence” for a link between the Pacific Ocean temperature signature and the stuck weather pattern, said John Walsh, an atmospheric scientist at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, who wasn’t involved in the studies. But is that the whole story? The other recent study suggests that the Arctic, too, could be playing a role in making the difference between East and West so stark. That study, also detailed in Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that while the Pacific heat set the atmospheric pattern in motion, Arctic sea ice loss in a particular region made the warm/cold difference so extreme, said Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University. Francis, who wasn’t involved with either study, is one of the main proponents of an idea that by altering how much heat the ocean lets out, sea ice melt and Arctic warming can also change atmospheric circulation patterns, in particular by making the jet stream form larger peaks, or highs, and troughs, or lows. Hence the more intense difference between East and West the last two winters. However, not all scientists are convinced by this idea and it has generated much debate in recent years. One key question Hartmann is keen on better understanding is how the overall warming of the planet might impact the climate cycles that potentially put the divide in place. In the historical records, he noticed that the NPM has been more prevalent since the 1970s — about the same time that the global temperature rise really took off. That raises the question of whether this pattern might become a more common influence on U.S. weather in the future. It’s a difficult question to answer, though, because climate models “are not in agreement on what should happen in the Pacific as a consequence of global warming,” Hartmann said. Given the terrible drought and dismal snowpack the warm Western winter has resulted in, “it would be likely a hugely bad thing if the global warming response was to give us more of this” East-West divided pattern, he said.
 

 •  Obama Says There Is ‘No Greater Threat’ Than Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

“Climate change can no longer be denied, or ignored,” the president says.
 

 •  California revises drought plan after pressure from cities 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California water regulators on Saturday revised a still-tentative drought plan by easing cuts for Los Angeles and San Diego and bumping up reduction targets in the areas that consume the most water.
 

 •  Severe weather stops circus act 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Severe weather forced a highwire trapeze act at a circus in Texas to stop and sent people running for the exits.
 

 •  Thunderstorms cause power outages, flight delays in Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Storms packing winds approaching 90 mph are sweeping across parts of Texas and Oklahoma, causing widespread power outages in the Dallas area — including at a professional soccer game.</p>
 

 •  New England's snowy winter pushes back gardening season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>The growing season is one to two weeks behind schedule after a winter that lacked the usual mid-season thaw and kept the snow piling up.</p>
 

 •  Nepal marks anniversary of deadliest avalanche 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Nepal on Saturday marked the anniversary of Mount Everest's deadliest avalanche with a memorial and a government announcement that it will set up a welfare fund for mountaineering and trekking workers in the Himalayan nation.</p>
 

 •  With his well nearly dry, a farmer draws on his resolve 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

REPORTING FROM POPLAR-COTTON CENTER, Calif. -- It was done. Over. No more waiting for rain, hoping for snow. The 32-year-old farmer in the barber's chair said his well wouldn't make it to summer. "I held...
 

 •  Photos: Sinkholes Form Along Shoreline of the Dead Sea 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The Dead Sea is disappearing at an alarming rate, leaving behind thousands of sinkholes that are chipping away at the coastline's vibrant and touristy...
 

 •  Fish in suspected tsunami debris boat quarantined in US 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The wreckage of a fishing boat that appears to be debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami was carrying some unexpected passengers — fish from Japanese waters — when it was spotted off the Oregon coast.Scientists say 21 yellowtail jacks and one Asian striped knifejaw hitched a cross-Pacific...
 

 •  Early Haiti rains bring risk of bleak cholera season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Haitian officials are reporting a spike in cholera cases late last year and carrying over into the first three months of 2015 as an early start to the rainy season has public health workers worried.
 

 •  Dutch Citizens Are Taking Their Government To Court Over Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A group of Dutch citizens headed to court this week in a bold effort to hold their government accountable for its inaction over climate change.
 

 •  How do MLB teams prepare for severe weather? 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>With 2,340 games scheduled from early spring to late summer every year, Major League Baseball is not unfamiliar with encountering challenging weather during its season.</p>
 

 •  Tornado Touches Down in Texas Panhandle 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail. The National Weather Service warned of damaging winds of 60mph in the area.This video shows the tornado near Briscoe. Credit: Facebook/Dustin Pool
 

 •  Lightning Strike Blinds Woman in One Eye 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Being struck by lightning is a rare event, and it can have some equally unusual medical effects. For one 77-year-old woman who survived being hit...
 

 •  Blizzard Conditions Contribute to Multi-Vehicle Crashes on I-80 in Wyo. 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

At least six people were critically injured Thursday after a 45-vehicle pile-up on a snowy Interstate 80 between Laramie and Cheyenne, Wyoming. Speeds...
 

 •  WATCH: Tornado Spotted In Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Apr 17, 2015; 7:51 AM ET A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail.
 

 •  March was hottest worldwide since 1880 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Rising temperatures across the planet have set another new record, as the US government announced Friday that the globe experienced its hottest month of March since record-keeping began in 1880.</p>
 

 •  Beijing's worst sandstorm in 13 years is just 'normal spring weather' 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Rule No. 1 for surviving Beijing's often-brutal living conditions: Develop a sense of humor. Smog. Frigid winters. Smog. Scorching summers. Smog. Gridlocked traffic. And oh, have you heard about the smog? The latest air assault came Wednesday afternoon, when a mighty wind transported several tons of Gobi Desert sand straight into China's capital.
 

 •  Harsh Northeast winter no hindrance to hungry ticks 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Think you're safe from ticks because the harsh winter froze them or because you haven't been trekking through the woods?Think again. Researchers focused on ticks and the debilitating diseases they spread say the heavy snow that blanketed the Northeast this winter was like a cozy quilt for baby blacklegged ticks that are now questing for blood as the weather warms up. And a researcher at New York's Binghamton University...
 

 •  Woman Swept Off Cliff by Giant Wave 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Brian Smith, and American student in Ireland was visiting the coast when he shot some amazing video.
 

 •  China's Smog Inspires Absolutely Terrifying PSAs 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Billowing smoke and furious animals combine in these "terror haze" illustrations.
 

Manali Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  The AccuWeather.com RSS Center 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

To discover additional weather feeds, visit the AccuWeather.com RSS Center at http://www.accuweather.com/en/downloads
 

Shimla Weather Forecast, Live Weather News


 •  The Milky Way Over Loon Island: A Stargazer's Stunning View (Photo) 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

This stunning panoramic of the Milky Way shows our host galaxy arching over Lake Sunapee. Astrophotographer A. Garrett Evans took the image Loon...
 

 •  System to Deliver Showers to West, Storms to Plains 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A new system moving into the West this week will spread showers over the region before raising the severe weather threat in the Plains. It does not look...
 

 •  Stunning images from this week in weather 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

 

 •  Almonds get roasted in debate over California water use 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California almonds are becoming one of the world's favorite snacks and creating a multibillion-dollar bonanza for agricultural investors. But the crop extracts a staggering price from the land, consuming more...
 

 •  Severe Threat for East Coast 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

11:21AM ET 04.19.15 The system that has been bringing severe weather to the Midwest and South is heading for the East Coast. It could be a stormy start of the week for millions.
 

 •  Agencies to Place 3-D Printed Weather Stations in Developing Countries 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A 3-D printer is creating the parts for affordable weather stations to be used in developing nations, where weather data is very limited. Data from the...
 

 •  Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

From blooming flowers to twittering birds, the signs of spring are popping up and the miseries of winter are becoming a distant memory for many. But not for some climate scientists. The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters as a wild zigzag of the jet stream has brought repeated bouts of Arctic air and snow to the East and kept the drought-plagued West baking under a record-breaking dome of heat. How temperatures across the U.S. varied compared to normal during February 2015, with red denoting hotter temperatures and blue colder. Credit: NOAA That persistent "warm west, cold east” winter pattern has set off a flurry of research aimed at uncovering why those regions of the U.S. spent winter locked in polar opposite situations, with plenty of questions remaining — including how global warming might be influencing whatever set the atmospheric pattern in motion. The climate shifts of the Pacific Ocean have been considered a primary suspect in driving the seemingly unbreakable divide, in part because many of these have a clear influence on U.S. weather. But two recent studies have pushed past these well-known climate cycles and brought attention to some other, perhaps underappreciated players, in both the Pacific and the Arctic. In one study, Dennis Hartmann, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington, pinpointed a climate cycle that seems to be linked to the most well-known of such phenomena, El Niño. This “new” cycle — which Hartmann calls the North Pacific Mode (NPM) — has been hinted at before, but hasn’t received as much scientific attention as its cousin. Like El Niño, the NPM features changes in ocean temperatures that then alter the circulation of the atmosphere, including over the U.S. The latter is marked by a pool of warm water in the tropical Pacific that sets off a domino effect in the atmosphere that shifts the jet stream around over the U.S. Similarly, the NPM features an area of raised ocean temperatures, but this time in a horseshoe pattern that reaches from the tropics, past the West Coast and into the North Pacific. Historical temperature records that Hartmann examined suggest that it also precedes an El Niño event. Both the warm water signature and a burgeoning El Niño were present over the past couple of years in the Pacific. Most importantly, the temperature records also show that the NPM matches up with the “warm West, cold East” divide that governed the last two winters. Specifically, it seems to historically coincide with a high pressure ridge over the West and a trough over the East. But their simultaneous appearance doesn’t prove the NPM caused the weather divide. To see if that could be the case, Hartmann used climate models, where he could plug in the warm sea surface temperatures and see if the East-West pattern followed. In his simulations, it did. The horseshoe pattern of warmer-than-normal Pacific Ocean waters that characterize the positive phase of the North Pacific Mode. Credit: Hartmann/Geophysical Research Letters Hartmann’s study, published online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, provides “compelling evidence” for a link between the Pacific Ocean temperature signature and the stuck weather pattern, said John Walsh, an atmospheric scientist at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, who wasn’t involved in the studies. But is that the whole story? The other recent study suggests that the Arctic, too, could be playing a role in making the difference between East and West so stark. That study, also detailed in Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that while the Pacific heat set the atmospheric pattern in motion, Arctic sea ice loss in a particular region made the warm/cold difference so extreme, said Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University. Francis, who wasn’t involved with either study, is one of the main proponents of an idea that by altering how much heat the ocean lets out, sea ice melt and Arctic warming can also change atmospheric circulation patterns, in particular by making the jet stream form larger peaks, or highs, and troughs, or lows. Hence the more intense difference between East and West the last two winters. However, not all scientists are convinced by this idea and it has generated much debate in recent years. One key question Hartmann is keen on better understanding is how the overall warming of the planet might impact the climate cycles that potentially put the divide in place. In the historical records, he noticed that the NPM has been more prevalent since the 1970s — about the same time that the global temperature rise really took off. That raises the question of whether this pattern might become a more common influence on U.S. weather in the future. It’s a difficult question to answer, though, because climate models “are not in agreement on what should happen in the Pacific as a consequence of global warming,” Hartmann said. Given the terrible drought and dismal snowpack the warm Western winter has resulted in, “it would be likely a hugely bad thing if the global warming response was to give us more of this” East-West divided pattern, he said.
 

 •  Obama Says There Is ‘No Greater Threat’ Than Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

“Climate change can no longer be denied, or ignored,” the president says.
 

 •  California revises drought plan after pressure from cities 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

California water regulators on Saturday revised a still-tentative drought plan by easing cuts for Los Angeles and San Diego and bumping up reduction targets in the areas that consume the most water.
 

 •  Severe weather stops circus act 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Severe weather forced a highwire trapeze act at a circus in Texas to stop and sent people running for the exits.
 

 •  Thunderstorms cause power outages, flight delays in Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Storms packing winds approaching 90 mph are sweeping across parts of Texas and Oklahoma, causing widespread power outages in the Dallas area — including at a professional soccer game.</p>
 

 •  New England's snowy winter pushes back gardening season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>The growing season is one to two weeks behind schedule after a winter that lacked the usual mid-season thaw and kept the snow piling up.</p>
 

 •  Nepal marks anniversary of deadliest avalanche 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Nepal on Saturday marked the anniversary of Mount Everest's deadliest avalanche with a memorial and a government announcement that it will set up a welfare fund for mountaineering and trekking workers in the Himalayan nation.</p>
 

 •  With his well nearly dry, a farmer draws on his resolve 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

REPORTING FROM POPLAR-COTTON CENTER, Calif. -- It was done. Over. No more waiting for rain, hoping for snow. The 32-year-old farmer in the barber's chair said his well wouldn't make it to summer. "I held...
 

 •  Photos: Sinkholes Form Along Shoreline of the Dead Sea 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The Dead Sea is disappearing at an alarming rate, leaving behind thousands of sinkholes that are chipping away at the coastline's vibrant and touristy...
 

 •  Fish in suspected tsunami debris boat quarantined in US 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

The wreckage of a fishing boat that appears to be debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami was carrying some unexpected passengers — fish from Japanese waters — when it was spotted off the Oregon coast.Scientists say 21 yellowtail jacks and one Asian striped knifejaw hitched a cross-Pacific...
 

 •  Early Haiti rains bring risk of bleak cholera season 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Haitian officials are reporting a spike in cholera cases late last year and carrying over into the first three months of 2015 as an early start to the rainy season has public health workers worried.
 

 •  Dutch Citizens Are Taking Their Government To Court Over Climate Change 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A group of Dutch citizens headed to court this week in a bold effort to hold their government accountable for its inaction over climate change.
 

 •  How do MLB teams prepare for severe weather? 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>With 2,340 games scheduled from early spring to late summer every year, Major League Baseball is not unfamiliar with encountering challenging weather during its season.</p>
 

 •  Tornado Touches Down in Texas Panhandle 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail. The National Weather Service warned of damaging winds of 60mph in the area.This video shows the tornado near Briscoe. Credit: Facebook/Dustin Pool
 

 •  Lightning Strike Blinds Woman in One Eye 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Being struck by lightning is a rare event, and it can have some equally unusual medical effects. For one 77-year-old woman who survived being hit...
 

 •  Blizzard Conditions Contribute to Multi-Vehicle Crashes on I-80 in Wyo. 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

At least six people were critically injured Thursday after a 45-vehicle pile-up on a snowy Interstate 80 between Laramie and Cheyenne, Wyoming. Speeds...
 

 •  WATCH: Tornado Spotted In Texas 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Apr 17, 2015; 7:51 AM ET A tornado touched down near Allison, Texas, on Thursday, April 16. The tornado came as severe thunderstorms swept through the Texas Panhandle region, also bringing heavy rain and large hail.
 

 •  March was hottest worldwide since 1880 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

<p>Rising temperatures across the planet have set another new record, as the US government announced Friday that the globe experienced its hottest month of March since record-keeping began in 1880.</p>
 

 •  Beijing's worst sandstorm in 13 years is just 'normal spring weather' 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Rule No. 1 for surviving Beijing's often-brutal living conditions: Develop a sense of humor. Smog. Frigid winters. Smog. Scorching summers. Smog. Gridlocked traffic. And oh, have you heard about the smog? The latest air assault came Wednesday afternoon, when a mighty wind transported several tons of Gobi Desert sand straight into China's capital.
 

 •  Harsh Northeast winter no hindrance to hungry ticks 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Think you're safe from ticks because the harsh winter froze them or because you haven't been trekking through the woods?Think again. Researchers focused on ticks and the debilitating diseases they spread say the heavy snow that blanketed the Northeast this winter was like a cozy quilt for baby blacklegged ticks that are now questing for blood as the weather warms up. And a researcher at New York's Binghamton University...
 

 •  Woman Swept Off Cliff by Giant Wave 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Brian Smith, and American student in Ireland was visiting the coast when he shot some amazing video.
 

 •  China's Smog Inspires Absolutely Terrifying PSAs 04/19/2015 01:58 PM

Billowing smoke and furious animals combine in these "terror haze" illustrations.